Search
Close this search box.
We are in the process of updating our website to give a better experience to our readers. Thank you for your patience as we work out the kinks and errors!
Search
Close this search box.

Artist & activist Yoko Ono’s Wish Tree puts down roots for a peaceful tomorrow

Yoko Ono’s new installation invites guests to be a part of the artist’s dream and express their hope for a more peaceful future.

Acclaimed artist and peace advocate, Yoko Ono, who was 12 years old and living in Japan when nuclear bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II, has spent more than six decades rallying for disarmament. The artist has always expressed a silent protest through her art. One of her endeavors is a global Wish Tree installation. Now, The Japan Institute and Portland Japanese Garden are partnering with the Nobel Peace Center, Yoko Ono’s studio, and public gardens worldwide to feature this installation.

Yoko Ono Wish Tree

Spread Peace: Wish Tree, an interactive artwork, invites visitors and provides them with a platform where they can hang notes sharing their wishes for a better, more peaceful world by stepping into Ms. Ono’s creative universe. This collaboration builds on the Yoko Ono: Peace is Power exhibition currently on display at the Nobel Peace Center in Oslo, Norway.

The Wish Tree will be showcased in five cities on five continents simultaneously at Portland Japanese Garden in the U.S., Keihanna Commemorative Garden in Japan, Kokoro no Niwa in Chile, Johannesburg Botanical Gardens in South Africa, and Eidsvoll’s square in Oslo, Norway.

In Oslo, the main street Karl Johan will host The Wish Tree from June 7. The same day, between 11:00 and 14:00 CET, the Tree will be installed at Eidsvoll’s square, outside the Norwegian Parliament, prospecting new participants to take part in this global undertaking. In the other gardens around the world, the Wish Tree will be within reach of people throughout the weekend.

Yoko Ono Wish Tree

Over time, the Wish Trees will become swathed in these hopeful missives, transforming into a visual embodiment of the community’s shared longing for a peaceful world. This interactive artwork, designed by Ms. Ono in 1996, has collected more than 2 million wishes from visitors worldwide. After the installations draw to a close, the wishes will be sent back to Ms. Ono and will be connected to the Imagine Peace Tower in Reykjavík, Iceland. The Peace Tower was built by Ms. Ono as a memorial for her husband, the English singer John Lennon.

“For Yoko Ono, the message of peace and art go hand in hand,” said Kjersti Fløgstad, Executive Director at Nobel Peace Center. “In her creative universe, people can explore their own hopes and wishes for a more peaceful world – and hope is something we really need in the time we live in.”

Such initiatives force the world to introspect and become a part of a global effort to raise our voices in support of the dream of catching a glimpse of a promising tomorrow.

SUGGESTED ARTICLES